Moscow's Pussy Riot is a hardcore girl band that causes havoc with provocative pop-up performances. Even in bitterly cold weather, their usual dress is skimpy skirts and tights, with their faces masked by brightly colored balaclavas. (ski-masks) Pussy Riot frequently mocks X-KGB commissar and (again?) president of Russia, Vladimar Putin, inspiring the joke: "Question: What do you get when you cross a potato with a penis? Answer: A Putin."

Dictator or not, on February 21, 2012, as a part of the growing dump Putin rebellion, Pussy Riot performed in the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour of the Russian Orthodox Church in Moscow. In the song, the group prayed to the “Holy Mother, Blessed Virgin” to “chase Putin out.”

"The Puter" faced with a collapsing economy, charges of election fraud and a growing rebellion in the streets might have done well to ignore the kookie girl group and their teen high-jinx had not the Patriarch of Moscow condemned Pussy Riot’s actions at Christ the Savior Cathedral as “blasphemous” saying that the “Devil has laughed at all of us".

“We have no future if we allow mocking in front of great shrines, and if some see such mocking as some sort of valour, as an expression of political protest, as an acceptable action or a harmless joke,” the Patriarch said.
Maria Alyokhina, Loktina, and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, alleged members of Pussy Riot, were arrested by Russian authorities and accused of “hooliganism”, for which they face up to 7 years in prison, but Pussy Riot has gained international fame and has become Russia's number one cultural export.

"The Puter" now looks goofy and lame for picking on teenage girls and potentially being beaten by them and for making mother Russia, land of the Sputnik and the Kalashnikov, a laughing stock world wide.

To make matters worse, the Patriarch subsequently sent a gang of leather clad monks into the streets to attack an assembled crowd of unhappy Pussy fans with squirt guns filled with holy water, sparking a riot, further humilating Putin when he was forced call out tanks to quiet the disturbance.

Meanwhile, several thousands of Orthodox and Catholic believers, the believers of other religions and atheists signed a petition to Patriarch Kirill, begging the head of the Russian Orthodox Church to stand up for the girls.

According to Union of Solidarity with Political Prisoners, all the women are charged with “hooliganism” according to article 213/2 of the Russian Criminal Code, without any evidence for incriminating such charges, which makes both pre-trial arrest and the charges illegal. All three are recognized as political prisoners by the Union of Solidarity with Political Prisoners (SPP). Amnesty International named them prisoners of conscience due to "the severity of the response of the Russian authorities".


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Putin's girl troubles don't end in Moscow. Yulia Tymoshenko, the "White Tigress" of the Orange Revolution sits in prison near Kiev, beaten, bruised and pneumoniac, and a new revolution is brewing on Russia's border. Yulia, a passionate revolutionary, smashed prison windows and led angry mobs against the regime of Leonid Kuchma resulting in his resignation in January 2005.

Former Communist Party Chairman Kuchma roams free but is under investigation for the murder of Georgy Gongadze, a journalist who specialised in uncovering corruption. In one of the most horrific post-Soviet crimes committed in Ukraine, the young journalist, Gongadze, was kidnapped in Kiev and his headless and badly disfigured corpse was found in a forest 40 miles from the Ukrainian capital. In secret taped conversations Kuchma discussed Putin's scheme to get possession of all documents that could be used as evidence against his former employer, Beteiligungs AG, a company suspected of facilitating Petersburg mobsters, Colombian drug lords money laundering.

Ukraine is the "bread basket of Europe". In Soviet times, Ukraine was the second largest industrial and agricultural component of the country’s planned economy. With the dissolution of the Soviet system, the country moved from a planned economy to a oligarchy plunging the majority of the population into want and hunger.

In December 2009, the second Tymoshenko Government proposed creating the first independent anti-corruption bureaus in Ukraine, believing that Ukraine's economy is excessively monopolized. Some Ukrainian politicians and academics have described Yulia as the people's socialist. She believes "building a genuine civil society" is the best way to help democracy. Yulia is a tough and populist maverick, who lists the recovery of the economy of Ukraine during the 2008–2009 Ukrainian financial crisis as one of her crowning achievements. She wants to increase the general level of social standards by equalizing salaries in the industrial and social spheres. She pledged in November 2009 to revamp Ukraine's hospitals and health system and she wants to cut taxes by a third, give tax breaks to farmers, offer tax breaks to importers of new technologies as well as to poor regions to boost investment.

Yulia is against foreign intervention in internal Ukrainian affairs: "Ukraine's realization of its sovereign rights, forming a modern political nation, cannot be considered as a policy aimed against anyone". Tymoshenko does not want to expand the lease contract of the Russian Black Sea fleet in Ukraine because "The Constitution of Ukraine quite clearly stipulates that foreign military bases cannot be deployed in Ukraine, and this constitutional clause is the fundamental basis of the state's security".

According to Tymoshenko, Ukraine is a "unitary and indivisible state". Tymoshenko considers separatist attitudes in Ukraine unacceptable; "Love one another, from Donetsk, Crimea, Luhansk, Dnipropetrovsk, Kharkiv, Lviv, Ternopil, Ivano-Frankivsk, Kiev and all the other corners of our native land". According to Tymoshenko, citizens in the Russian-speaking Dnipropetrovsk already understood Ukrainian in Soviet times and any problems surrounding the Russian language in Ukraine were being "exaggerated and don't exist".

As energy Deputy Prime Minister, Yulia ended corrupt arrangements in the energy sector. She increased Ukraine's electricity revenue several thousand percent, scrapped barter, requiring industry to pay for electricity in cash, terminated exemptions for many organizations. Her reforms meant that the government had sufficient funds to pay civil servants and increase salaries. Tymoshenko was fired by President Leonid Kuchma in January 2001 after conflicts with oligarchs in the industry.

According to Yulia, the charges were fabricated by Kuchma's regime at the behest of oligarchs threatened by her efforts to root out corruption and institute market-based reforms. In spite of being cleared of the charges, Moscow maintained an arrest warrant for Tymoshenko should she enter Russia. Early July 2011 Ukrainian security service opened a new criminal investigation of United Energy Systems of Ukrain.

In February 2011, Tymoshenko stated "Viktor Yanukovych’s naked attempt to hijack the election that precipitated the Orange Revolution should have resulted in him being banned from running in future elections". United States and European Union (EU) officials called the prosecution of Tymoshenko "selective prosecution of political opponents" and that the Ukrainian Government handling of the case risked deep implications for its hopes of EU integration.

On 11 October 2011, the court found Tymoshenko guilty of abuse of power, sentenced her to seven years in jail, and ordered her to pay the state $188 million. Tymoshenko did appeal against the sentence on 24 October 2011, which she compared to Stalin's Great Terror. Tymoshenko's defense lawyer stated Tymoshenko will not file any applications for a pardon since "the trial of Tymoshenko has nothing to do with justice according to European standards". Yulia stated the same day "Today we are behind bars. But if we have to pay such a price for the liberation of the country, then we are ready to pay it".



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